RUSSIA AIN’T YOUR FRIEND – Prophetic word to the Church

The Christian Church has been played like a fiddle.
Trump has the maturity of a child. “You think America is so innocent”, says the child president. I understand the benefit of being introspective, that is maturity. But it is a big difference between being introspective and childish. “When I was a child I thought as a child.” In this case, the child has become the President of the United States due to the “Christian Right” seeking a conservative supreme court justice appointee and a Zionist President.

I am here to prophecy that it is all going to backfire and the selection of Trump as the great Christian hope will be a cataclysmic church failure.

 

~Ellington Haywood Ellis~

February 15, 2017

Madame C. J. Walker the first female millionaire in America

 

The year is 1905, ten years before the founding of the Maybelline cosmetic company, Madame C.J. Walker founded her cosmetic company, and within 10 years became America’s first female millionaire.

“This modern day Oprah Winfrey made her fortune innovating beauty and hair products for women through Madame C.J. Walker Manufacturing Company, the successful business she founded. she became one of the wealthiest African American women in the country, “the world’s most successful female entrepreneur of her time,” and one of the most successful African-American business owners ever.”

It is interesting to note that Madame C. J. Walker was an associate of the Pentecostal Bishop, Garfield Thomas Haywood. She was known to have supported Haywood’s ministry and attended his funeral upon his death. In fact, the general legal counsel of the C. J. Walker conglomerate, Attorney Robert Lee Brokenburr, another close friend of Haywood, offered his tribute upon Haywood’s death, as reported and in the Indianapolis Recorder Newspaper, “Haywood will go down in history as one of the greatest religious leaders of our generation. He was unselfish and interested in every movement for the uplifting of mankind irrespective of race or color. His activities prove conclusively that a Negro can be more than a Negro leader, for many of his followings were large numbers of the best type of white folks in the country. People of all races came to be taught by him from all parts of the country.

In the founding and developing of his church he did with many of the best minds thought would be impossible; [he brought whites and blacks together.] He had the courage of his conviction, and will carry on in the face of any kind of a position without thought or fear of personal consequences. His presence will long be missed and his services will benefit mankind throughout the years.”

Image: Attorney R. L. Brokenburr. Prominent for years in civil rights litigation in Indianapolis, Indiana.

This relationship between Haywood and C. J. Walker is yet another marker of Pentecostal Oneness influence on America’s growth and race inclusiveness.

It is often said behind every great man is a great woman. Madame C J Walker reveals a greater truth.

 

Black History Month – Honoring the Power of Pentecostalism

 

 

James Baldwin, one of the most celebrated black novelist essayist, poet, and social critic was, “one of these”. He was baptized, spoke in other tongues and was indwelled with the Holy Spirit (Acts 2:38). He attended the Mt Calvary Pentecostal church as well as the Fireside Pentecostal church in NYC, where he became a prolific Pentecostal evangelist. Baldwin eventually left religion, but most literary experts say that the strength of Baldwin’s writings and speeches was his cadence of a Pentecostal preacher. Who can argue that the power of Pentecostalism is unmistakably life-changing.

From “Notes of a Native Son” by James Baldwin (Beacon Press, 2012)

Baldwin (right of center) with Hollywood actors Charlton Heston and Marlon Brando at the 1963 Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C. Sidney Poitier (rear) and Harry Belafonte (right of Brando) can also be seen in the crowd.

“Aunt Jemima and Uncle Tom are dead, their places taken by a group of amazingly well-adjusted young men and women, almost as dark, but ferociously literate, well-dressed and scrubbed, who are never laughed at, who are not likely ever to set foot in a cotton or tobacco field or in any but the most modern of kitchens. There are others who remain, in our odd idiom, “underprivileged”; some are bitter and these come to grief; some are unhappy, but, continually presented with the evidence of a better day soon to come, are speedily becoming less so. Most of them care nothing whatever about race. They want only their proper place in the sun and the right to be left alone, like any other citizen of the republic. We may all breathe more easily. Before, however, our joy at the demise of Aunt Jemima and Uncle Tom approaches the indecent, we had better ask whence they sprang, how they lived? Into what limbo have they vanished?

However inaccurate our portraits of them were, these portraits do suggest, not only the conditions, but the quality of their lives and the impact of this spectacle on our consciences. There was no one more forbearing than Aunt Jemima, no one stronger or more pious or more loyal or more wise; there was, at the same time, no one weaker or more faithless or more vicious and certainly no one more immoral. Uncle Tom, trustworthy and sexless, needed only to drop the title “Uncle” to become violent, crafty, and sullen, a menace to any white woman who passed by. They prepared our feast tables and our burial clothes; and, if we could boast that we understood them, it was far more to the point and far more true that they understood us. They were, moreover, the only people in the world who did; and not only did they know us better than we knew ourselves, but they knew us better than we knew them. This was the piquant flavoring to the national joke, it lay behind our uneasiness as it lay behind our benevolence: Aunt Jemima and Uncle Tom, our creations, at the last evaded us; they had a life—their own, perhaps a better life than ours—and they would never tell us what it was. At the point where we were driven most privately and painfully to conjecture what depths of contempt, what heights of indifference, what prodigies of resilience, what untamable superiority allowed them so vividly to endure, neither perishing nor rising up in a body to wipe us from the earth, the image perpetually shattered and the word failed. The black man in our midst carried murder in his heart, he wanted vengeance. We carried murder too, we wanted peace.

Image: Time

In our image of the Negro breathes the past we deny, not dead but living yet and powerful, the beast in our jungle of statistics. It is this which defeats us, which continues to defeat us, which lends to interracial cocktail parties their rattling, genteel, nervously smiling air: in any drawing room at such a gathering the beast may spring, filling the air with flying things and an unenlightened wailing. Wherever the problem touches there is confusion, there is danger. Wherever the Negro face appears a tension is created, the tension of a silence filled with things unutterable. It is a sentimental error, therefore, to believe that the past is dead; it means nothing to say that it is all forgotten, that the Negro himself has forgotten it. It is not a question of memory. Oedipus did not remember the thongs that bound his feet; nevertheless the marks they left testified to that doom toward which his feet were leading him. The man does not remember the hand that struck him, the darkness that frightened him, as a child; nevertheless, the hand and the darkness remain with him, indivisible from himself forever, part of the passion that drives him wherever he thinks to take flight.”

Image: Public Domain

In the words of Grammy award winner, Donnie McClurkin’s song, “Speak to my heart Holy Spirit, give me the words that will bring new life, words on the wings of a morning, my dark nights will fade away, speak to my heart.

 

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Black History Month Honors White History Heroics

John Brown (1800-1859) – “I consecrate my life to the destruction of slavery.” A fervent abolitionist who believed in armed insurrection against the institution of slavery. In 1859, he led an armed uprising in Harpers Ferry, Virginia aiming to free slaves and end the practice. He was executed for his attempted uprising.

After the Civil War, Frederick Douglass wrote, “His zeal in the cause of my race was far greater than mine—it was as the burning sun to my taper light—mine was bounded by time, his stretched away to the boundless shores of eternity. I could live for the slave, but he could die for him.

The Last Moments of John Brown (1882–84) by Thomas Hovenden

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The Wall Mirage

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Credit AP

 

Walls may work temporarily in keeping people out, but it will never work in keeping prosperity within. Walls are self imposed sanctions. Keeping people out has never equated to keeping peace within. History teaches us that walls serve as accelerators to internal chaos. History further instructs that bridge building, not walls, create both peace and prosperity. A voice we never want to hear, America, “Tear Down That Wall.”

 

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Inherent in a Wall is the Inflammation of Hate

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Hate inflames on both sides of a wall regardless of who builds it.

Walls generate division, exclusiveness, and strife. Minorities more than the majority are keenly sensitive to the detriments and ills of a wall. It is historically evident that no sustainable good will ever come from building a wall.

Walls kill, not on one side, but on both sides. History is replete with people and nations falling into a tempting mirage of wall building. Let’s hope that the “shining city on the hill”, America, avoids this fate.

 

A Oneness Pentecostal – Making a Difference

The Daily Maverick Image

 

It is true that Oneness Pentecostalism is a quandary to a lot of people. But where one finds Oneness influence there appears to be direct correlation to positive growth.

Ethiopia is the second-most populous country in Sub-Saharan Africa with a population of 99.4 million, and population growth rate of 2.5% in 2015. One of the world’s oldest civilizations, Ethiopia is also one of the world’s poorest countries. The country’s per capita income of $590 is substantially lower than the regional average (Gross National Income, Atlas Method). The government aspires to reach lower-middle income status over the next decade.

 

The economy has experienced strong and broad based growth over the past decade, averaging 10.8% per year in 2003/04 – 2014/15 compared to the regional average of 5.4%. Expansion of the services and agricultural sectors account for most of this growth, while manufacturing sector performance was relatively modest. Private consumption and public investment explain demand side growth with the latter assuming an increasingly important role in recent years.

 

Economic growth brought with it positive trends in poverty reduction, in both urban and rural areas. While 55.3% of Ethiopians lived in extreme poverty in 2000, by 2011, this figure was reduced to 33.5% as measured by the international poverty line, of less than $1.90 per day.

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Oneness Pentecostalism, a religious movement that spawned between 1898-1906 with a handful of faithful followers, now has over 30 million members.

 

There is a glaring divide between Oneness and other forms of Pentecostalism, in that Oneness holds the dogma of the Oneness of God, and not a three-part God, better known as the Trinity; three Gods in one – God, the Father, God the Son, and God the Holyspirit. Oneness teaches that God is not divided into three Gods, but rather he is One; “Hear that the Lord your God is One.” (KJV)

 

 Like the first century Christians, the Oneness Movement started out as a small band of men and women. Largely centered in Indianapolis, Indiana, the small movement had a group of passionate leaders committed to its first century Jewish founder, Jesus of Nazareth. The early Oneness movement leaders included Frank Ewart, Glenn Cook, Garfield T. Haywood, Iranian-born Assyrian Andrew D. Urshan, and Howard A. Goss.

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Also, mirroring its 30 AD founders, the Oneness Pentecostal movement centered on a charismatic Leader, Garfield Thomas Haywood. According to Talmadge L. French in his book, “Early Interracial Oneness Pentecostalism (2014), the African American Leader, Garfield T. Haywood was its primary architect and figures most prominently into the movements history, not only as one of its leading proponents, but as its central interracial voice, as well as its most renowned leader.

 

From its obscure beginnings the flourishing movement has spread globally and have entered a mainstream of spiritual, political influence. President Bill Clinton, the 42nd President of the United States acknowledges to coming under the influence of the Oneness Pentecostal movement, during some of his most tumultuous times, and claims to have been greatly affected by the engagement.

 

The Prime Minister of Ethiopia, Africa, Hailemariam Desalegn, is a Oneness Pentecostal believer.

 

“Hailemariam is from the Wolayta ethnic group of Ethiopia, an Omotic community which forms the principal population group in Ethiopia’s Southern Nations, Nationalities, and People’s Region. His family belongs to the Apostolic Church of Ethiopia, a Oneness Pentecostal denomination that is not part of mainstream Ethiopian Protestant Christianity (Pentay), which believes in Trinitarianism.”

 

Ethiopia is the largest African Nation in terms of population (102,374,044) and has all the potential to be a great Nation. Let us pray that a Oneness raised leader can make a difference.

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The Pettiford’s – “Making America”

B. D and Emma Pettiford

ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO
Bishop G. T. and Ida Haywood

 

By covered wagon, like many that entered the wild west, B. D. Pettiford and Emma Pettiford traveled to Albuquerque, New Mexico from Indiana, seeking a better and healthier way of life. The year is 1915 when they arrive, and the spirit of God and the spirit of entrepreneurship kicked into full bloom. These great people were more than idle citizens of the great west, they help shape the landscape.

District Elder B. D. Pettiford founded God’s House Church. I first visited the church in 1991. Abutting the beautiful Sandia mountains, I nicknamed the place, “the church of the mountains.” It was nearly seventy four years earlier that my great grandfather, G. T. Haywood visited this same church. Bishop G. T. Haywood and District Elder Beverly Pettiford had long been friends and confidants from their early days in the State of Indiana.

In this City by the mountains, Emma Pettiford, B. D. Pettiford’s wife, founded an entrepreneur club, called “The Dorcas Club” This organization manufactured and distributed a variety of products, raising funds for ministry.

As a direct outcome of faith and entrepreneurship, God’s House Church is still a pillar in the Albuquerque landscape.

To be certain, all things are connected in God’s Universe (Oneness). Exactly one hundred years after the founding of God’s House Church, I, the heir of G.T. Haywood, will be speaking, November 27, 2016 at Victory Fellowship Church in Detroit, Michigan pastored by Thomas Livingston and where B. D. Pettiford’s heir, Omega Livingston, is First Lady.

We are all one.

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What the World Needs Now…The Oneness Posse

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The man at the CENTER of it all…Beyond Comprehension

“The Life of Haywood” is a fascinating biography about one of the least-known chapters in the life of Bishop Garfield Thomas Haywood. It is eye-opening, inspiring and informative.

Revealed and written through a great grandson, it is an insider’s perspective on the life and times of the man. This biography is an unparalleled story about Haywood. It engages the intersection of religion and race in America at the turn of the 20th century.

Long before Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the civil rights movement, the oneness posse of Haywood, Urshan, Rowe, Doak, Lewis and Varnell, Hancock among others are paving the way of racial togetherness. Today, being led by the United Pentecostal Church (UPCI), the Pentecostal Assemblies of the World (PAW) and Pentecostal Churches of the Apostolic Faith (PCAF), the Oneness Pentecostal movement stands alone in its unprecedented commitment to racial harmony. This book takes you on fascinating real life journey of the man at the center of it all.

Living without the Camp

Chapter 1 Excerpt

…Penny Haywood is awaken from a deep sleep to hear the footsteps of slave catchers. She could see the early morning sunlight peaking its way through the rotting planks of the old plantation barn. A warm loving, but shaking palm, is covering her mouth. ‘Duh slave catchus be here,” whispers her mother. They both laid quietly on the cold floor. An eternal hour lingers before the slave catchers are gone.

Penny Haywood tells this story of her early slave life to her young son Garfield Haywood. This story has a profound impact upon Garfield’s life. Born into slavery Bennett and Penny Haywood, the parents of G.T. Haywood, had an unwanted front row seat to one of the most tumultuous times in human history. However, a far more gripping revelation is that the Haywood’s were not only escapees along the underground railroad, but they became active railroad conductors leading others to freedom; foretelling a greater work to come.

Shackled not only with chains, but confined with humiliation, and depression. “Living without the camp” became commonplace for the Haywood’s but it never became a place of complacency…

                                                                    Huffington Post

 

Make America Great Again…

…The Problem I have with “Make America Great Again” My family and some others pictured here just got the right to vote 60 years earlier. America is great!

My Uncle Elder Collins, My Great Grandfather Bishop Haywood, My other Great-grandfather Bishop Hancock, and my namesake Bishop Ellington Forbes, loving history more today!

~Ellington L. Ellis~

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