THE FOLLY OF FIGHTING PROGRESSIVES

 

This post centers on the folly of disrupting the will of the people. You may get by with it in any given election, but it is not sustainable. You can alter destiny, but you can never stop it. This is the fight that I have with Conservatism. Everything must change. Inherent in conservative ideology is conserve. Nothing is conserved, everything is changing. People are not human beings, we are human becomings; we are constantly changing, physically and mentally every millisecond. Conservatives, are fighting against destiny.

We can slow change down, I surmise, but we can never stop it. To believe we can stop progressives or progression is folly in itself. Again, things naturally move from order to chaos (Entropy) Conservatism is a struggle against entropy – degradation – Decomposition – degeneration – decline. Example: when the republicans held up Obama’s supreme court nominee for over a year, it was an attempt to alter progression – change – degeneration – progress. They did nothing more than alter, slowed down change. You cannot stop progressiveness, you can only slow it down. Altering progress always puts one on the wrong side of history. Republicans will live in a constant state of stress and turmoil until they understand this principle.

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Madame C. J. Walker the first female millionaire in America

 

The year is 1905, ten years before the founding of the Maybelline cosmetic company, Madame C.J. Walker founded her cosmetic company, and within 10 years became America’s first female millionaire.

“This modern day Oprah Winfrey made her fortune innovating beauty and hair products for women through Madame C.J. Walker Manufacturing Company, the successful business she founded. she became one of the wealthiest African American women in the country, “the world’s most successful female entrepreneur of her time,” and one of the most successful African-American business owners ever.”

It is interesting to note that Madame C. J. Walker was an associate of the Pentecostal Bishop, Garfield Thomas Haywood. She was known to have supported Haywood’s ministry and attended his funeral upon his death. In fact, the general legal counsel of the C. J. Walker conglomerate, Attorney Robert Lee Brokenburr, another close friend of Haywood, offered his tribute upon Haywood’s death, as reported and in the Indianapolis Recorder Newspaper, “Haywood will go down in history as one of the greatest religious leaders of our generation. He was unselfish and interested in every movement for the uplifting of mankind irrespective of race or color. His activities prove conclusively that a Negro can be more than a Negro leader, for many of his followings were large numbers of the best type of white folks in the country. People of all races came to be taught by him from all parts of the country.

In the founding and developing of his church he did with many of the best minds thought would be impossible; [he brought whites and blacks together.] He had the courage of his conviction, and will carry on in the face of any kind of a position without thought or fear of personal consequences. His presence will long be missed and his services will benefit mankind throughout the years.”

Image: Attorney R. L. Brokenburr. Prominent for years in civil rights litigation in Indianapolis, Indiana.

This relationship between Haywood and C. J. Walker is yet another marker of Pentecostal Oneness influence on America’s growth and race inclusiveness.

It is often said behind every great man is a great woman. Madame C J Walker reveals a greater truth.

 

Black History Month – Honoring the Power of Pentecostalism

 

 

James Baldwin, one of the most celebrated black novelist essayist, poet, and social critic was, “one of these”. He was baptized, spoke in other tongues and was indwelled with the Holy Spirit (Acts 2:38). He attended the Mt Calvary Pentecostal church as well as the Fireside Pentecostal church in NYC, where he became a prolific Pentecostal evangelist. Baldwin eventually left religion, but most literary experts say that the strength of Baldwin’s writings and speeches was his cadence of a Pentecostal preacher. Who can argue that the power of Pentecostalism is unmistakably life-changing.

From “Notes of a Native Son” by James Baldwin (Beacon Press, 2012)

Baldwin (right of center) with Hollywood actors Charlton Heston and Marlon Brando at the 1963 Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C. Sidney Poitier (rear) and Harry Belafonte (right of Brando) can also be seen in the crowd.

“Aunt Jemima and Uncle Tom are dead, their places taken by a group of amazingly well-adjusted young men and women, almost as dark, but ferociously literate, well-dressed and scrubbed, who are never laughed at, who are not likely ever to set foot in a cotton or tobacco field or in any but the most modern of kitchens. There are others who remain, in our odd idiom, “underprivileged”; some are bitter and these come to grief; some are unhappy, but, continually presented with the evidence of a better day soon to come, are speedily becoming less so. Most of them care nothing whatever about race. They want only their proper place in the sun and the right to be left alone, like any other citizen of the republic. We may all breathe more easily. Before, however, our joy at the demise of Aunt Jemima and Uncle Tom approaches the indecent, we had better ask whence they sprang, how they lived? Into what limbo have they vanished?

However inaccurate our portraits of them were, these portraits do suggest, not only the conditions, but the quality of their lives and the impact of this spectacle on our consciences. There was no one more forbearing than Aunt Jemima, no one stronger or more pious or more loyal or more wise; there was, at the same time, no one weaker or more faithless or more vicious and certainly no one more immoral. Uncle Tom, trustworthy and sexless, needed only to drop the title “Uncle” to become violent, crafty, and sullen, a menace to any white woman who passed by. They prepared our feast tables and our burial clothes; and, if we could boast that we understood them, it was far more to the point and far more true that they understood us. They were, moreover, the only people in the world who did; and not only did they know us better than we knew ourselves, but they knew us better than we knew them. This was the piquant flavoring to the national joke, it lay behind our uneasiness as it lay behind our benevolence: Aunt Jemima and Uncle Tom, our creations, at the last evaded us; they had a life—their own, perhaps a better life than ours—and they would never tell us what it was. At the point where we were driven most privately and painfully to conjecture what depths of contempt, what heights of indifference, what prodigies of resilience, what untamable superiority allowed them so vividly to endure, neither perishing nor rising up in a body to wipe us from the earth, the image perpetually shattered and the word failed. The black man in our midst carried murder in his heart, he wanted vengeance. We carried murder too, we wanted peace.

Image: Time

In our image of the Negro breathes the past we deny, not dead but living yet and powerful, the beast in our jungle of statistics. It is this which defeats us, which continues to defeat us, which lends to interracial cocktail parties their rattling, genteel, nervously smiling air: in any drawing room at such a gathering the beast may spring, filling the air with flying things and an unenlightened wailing. Wherever the problem touches there is confusion, there is danger. Wherever the Negro face appears a tension is created, the tension of a silence filled with things unutterable. It is a sentimental error, therefore, to believe that the past is dead; it means nothing to say that it is all forgotten, that the Negro himself has forgotten it. It is not a question of memory. Oedipus did not remember the thongs that bound his feet; nevertheless the marks they left testified to that doom toward which his feet were leading him. The man does not remember the hand that struck him, the darkness that frightened him, as a child; nevertheless, the hand and the darkness remain with him, indivisible from himself forever, part of the passion that drives him wherever he thinks to take flight.”

Image: Public Domain

In the words of Grammy award winner, Donnie McClurkin’s song, “Speak to my heart Holy Spirit, give me the words that will bring new life, words on the wings of a morning, my dark nights will fade away, speak to my heart.

 

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Black History Month Honors White History Heroics

John Brown (1800-1859) – “I consecrate my life to the destruction of slavery.” A fervent abolitionist who believed in armed insurrection against the institution of slavery. In 1859, he led an armed uprising in Harpers Ferry, Virginia aiming to free slaves and end the practice. He was executed for his attempted uprising.

After the Civil War, Frederick Douglass wrote, “His zeal in the cause of my race was far greater than mine—it was as the burning sun to my taper light—mine was bounded by time, his stretched away to the boundless shores of eternity. I could live for the slave, but he could die for him.

The Last Moments of John Brown (1882–84) by Thomas Hovenden

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The Wall Mirage

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Credit AP

 

Walls may work temporarily in keeping people out, but it will never work in keeping prosperity within. Walls are self imposed sanctions. Keeping people out has never equated to keeping peace within. History teaches us that walls serve as accelerators to internal chaos. History further instructs that bridge building, not walls, create both peace and prosperity. A voice we never want to hear, America, “Tear Down That Wall.”

 

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Inherent in a Wall is the Inflammation of Hate

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Hate inflames on both sides of a wall regardless of who builds it.

Walls generate division, exclusiveness, and strife. Minorities more than the majority are keenly sensitive to the detriments and ills of a wall. It is historically evident that no sustainable good will ever come from building a wall.

Walls kill, not on one side, but on both sides. History is replete with people and nations falling into a tempting mirage of wall building. Let’s hope that the “shining city on the hill”, America, avoids this fate.

 

Bernie Sanders asks Betsy Devos – Would You Be Sitting Here Today if You Were Not a Billionaire?

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Betsy Devos – Secretary of Education, Nominee

 

I found myself in one of those rare moments of screaming at my smart phone, “Have you, Bernie Sanders, ever seen a dying 7-year-old at the Helen Devos Children’s Hospital? What would that 7-year-old sitting in heaven, be thinking of you sitting here today, and how would she answer your question posed to Betsy Devos.

 

Nominated as Education Secretary, Betsy Devos had to face the music from an elite group of Senators. “How much have you donated to the Republicans over the years. Will you commit that you will not work to privatize, or cut funding” for public schools, “Guns, do they have any place in or around schools?”

 

 

With the rapidity of a machine gun, the questions kept coming, and with grace she answered politely. When Senator Elizabeth Warren asked, if she or any of her children had ever had to take out a student loan to help pay for college. “They have been fortunate not to,” DeVos stated humbly.

 

The elite attitude from a group of elite Senators was apparent today. Regardless of any position on school vouchers or gun control, the spirit of the questions, I think, were apparent and wrong. I hope that my thoughts are not skewed by my knowledge of the good Betsy Devos and her family have contributed to Michigan throughout the years, but there has to be a better way of asking questions apart from grandstanding.

 

Betsy’s biggest critics argue that she is for school vouchers. These are vouchers paid for by taxpayers, given to private companies, for public education. The detractors contend that taxpayer dollars should not be used for private companies, even it is for the intended public good. The greater fear of her opposers, perhaps, is that voucher policies will do away with public schools. It is a fair argument. Let’s have the discussion. The naysayers, also point to Michigan’s voucher policy implementation, utilized by charter schools, as an example of voucher’s inherent failures. Over forty percent, critics claim, of Michigan’s Charter schools are a dismal failure. Again, this is a fair argument. Let’s have the discussion.

 

I suspect further that many of her detractors are weary that she is a conservative Christian and is willing to force her views on others under the name of vouchers and private schools. Let’s have the discussion.

 

I am in no means advocating that the Senate shun their responsibilities as an advise and consent body, but it easy to be self-righteous, argumentative, and even fearful of another when you have not walked in their shoes. It is timely for the senators to be reminded of the words of Martin Luther King, Jr. “People fail to get along because they fear each other; and they fear each other because they don’t know each other; and they don’t know each other because they have not communicated with each other.”

 

Well, I do know the Devos’s, and I suppose, like all of us, there is good at the very core. The good that I see coming from the core of Betsy Devos, I love.

 

HELEN DEVOS CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL
Khalique-Vialva and Mom

 

The Dick and Betsy Devos website states, “Our faith motivates our giving; it is integral to who we are and what we do. Our giving is centered in cultivating leadership, accelerating transformation and leveraging support in five areas:

 

Justice: Fundamentally, we believe all people have the right and access to justice. We support organizations that help free, rescue, or provide access to the oppressed and the vulnerable.

 

Education: We strive to be a catalyst for positive change by expanding choices and improving access opportunities primarily in K-12 education.

 

Community: We endeavor to make West Michigan a desirable place to live by supporting efforts that lead to community transformation, improve community health and provide support for essential community needs.

 

Arts: Nationally and internationally, we build capacity in arts leaders and equip them to effectively manage and lead their organizations.

 

Leadership: With intention, we aim to train, equip, support and develop leaders.

 

Rather than screaming at grandstanding senators, that cannot hear me, it may be better for me to holler, and advocate until the words of Dick and Betsy Devos become reality.

 

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A Oneness Pentecostal – Making a Difference

The Daily Maverick Image

 

It is true that Oneness Pentecostalism is a quandary to a lot of people. But where one finds Oneness influence there appears to be direct correlation to positive growth.

Ethiopia is the second-most populous country in Sub-Saharan Africa with a population of 99.4 million, and population growth rate of 2.5% in 2015. One of the world’s oldest civilizations, Ethiopia is also one of the world’s poorest countries. The country’s per capita income of $590 is substantially lower than the regional average (Gross National Income, Atlas Method). The government aspires to reach lower-middle income status over the next decade.

 

The economy has experienced strong and broad based growth over the past decade, averaging 10.8% per year in 2003/04 – 2014/15 compared to the regional average of 5.4%. Expansion of the services and agricultural sectors account for most of this growth, while manufacturing sector performance was relatively modest. Private consumption and public investment explain demand side growth with the latter assuming an increasingly important role in recent years.

 

Economic growth brought with it positive trends in poverty reduction, in both urban and rural areas. While 55.3% of Ethiopians lived in extreme poverty in 2000, by 2011, this figure was reduced to 33.5% as measured by the international poverty line, of less than $1.90 per day.

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Oneness Pentecostalism, a religious movement that spawned between 1898-1906 with a handful of faithful followers, now has over 30 million members.

 

There is a glaring divide between Oneness and other forms of Pentecostalism, in that Oneness holds the dogma of the Oneness of God, and not a three-part God, better known as the Trinity; three Gods in one – God, the Father, God the Son, and God the Holyspirit. Oneness teaches that God is not divided into three Gods, but rather he is One; “Hear that the Lord your God is One.” (KJV)

 

 Like the first century Christians, the Oneness Movement started out as a small band of men and women. Largely centered in Indianapolis, Indiana, the small movement had a group of passionate leaders committed to its first century Jewish founder, Jesus of Nazareth. The early Oneness movement leaders included Frank Ewart, Glenn Cook, Garfield T. Haywood, Iranian-born Assyrian Andrew D. Urshan, and Howard A. Goss.

allafrica.com Image

 

Also, mirroring its 30 AD founders, the Oneness Pentecostal movement centered on a charismatic Leader, Garfield Thomas Haywood. According to Talmadge L. French in his book, “Early Interracial Oneness Pentecostalism (2014), the African American Leader, Garfield T. Haywood was its primary architect and figures most prominently into the movements history, not only as one of its leading proponents, but as its central interracial voice, as well as its most renowned leader.

 

From its obscure beginnings the flourishing movement has spread globally and have entered a mainstream of spiritual, political influence. President Bill Clinton, the 42nd President of the United States acknowledges to coming under the influence of the Oneness Pentecostal movement, during some of his most tumultuous times, and claims to have been greatly affected by the engagement.

 

The Prime Minister of Ethiopia, Africa, Hailemariam Desalegn, is a Oneness Pentecostal believer.

 

“Hailemariam is from the Wolayta ethnic group of Ethiopia, an Omotic community which forms the principal population group in Ethiopia’s Southern Nations, Nationalities, and People’s Region. His family belongs to the Apostolic Church of Ethiopia, a Oneness Pentecostal denomination that is not part of mainstream Ethiopian Protestant Christianity (Pentay), which believes in Trinitarianism.”

 

Ethiopia is the largest African Nation in terms of population (102,374,044) and has all the potential to be a great Nation. Let us pray that a Oneness raised leader can make a difference.

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Grand Rapids Police – Crime is Down – NFL Player Up

Officer Michael Harris addresses the audience at a ceremony for his 2016 Maytag Dependable Leader Award at the Goei Center in Grand Rapids on Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016. Officer Harris is receiving a $20,000 grant for his work with the Boys & Girls Club Grand Rapids Youth Commonwealth. (Allison Farrand | MLive.com)

 

 

Today, the front page of the Grand Rapids Press highlights “Community Policing” entitling it “The Spirit of the law.” The article infers that crime in Grand Rapids is linked to a $2.5M community policing effort.

 

It is evident that the Grand Rapids police department believes that Black Lives Matter. To affirm that black lives matter does not presuppose that other lives do not matter. Community Policing appears to be having a positive impact in Grand Rapids. The Grand Rapids Police Department have embraced the community that they now serve.

 

The news report has as its centerpiece Dallas Cowboy safety, and Grand Rapids native Kavon Frazier, as a glowing example of the impact of community policing. Kavon raised by a single mother in a poverty stricken environment, was headed in the wrong direction until encountering officer Michael Harris and the community policing efforts of Grand Rapids police department.

 

“I grew up around officers and some were like father figures to me,” Frazier said. “Having a relationship with those officers was good, because all them bad stereotypes about police officers, especially in the black community, it basically shut them down.”

 

twitter.com/kay_blacksimba

 

They never gave up on anyone, Kavon tells Justin Hicks, a reporter at MLive. “Not all officers are bad people, and it hurts that this stuff is going on, especially how I grew up” referring to the recent increase in violence against police officer. The officers in blue, have become more than uniforms to Kavon. This is the true value of community Policing.

 

It is my contention, from experience in law enforcement, that in every community there is a small and same recurrent element that is responsible for more than 90% of the crime. Further, elements responsible for crime are birth out of poverty and despair. Additionally, of the poverty stricken criminal elements responsible for violent crimes, 90% have great mental deficiencies. The deviant behaviors from this small minority is a known element to most police departments. Among this group, no amount of community policing will suffice. Deviant personalities we will have with us always.

 

At the heart of the community policing philosophy is the belief that not all person in a community are criminals, and non-deviant elements should not be treated as deviant elements. Community policing also puts forth the fact that insulating violent criminals from non-violent criminals, via officer and citizen training alike, is a way of reducing crime and stopping the growth thereof. Further, it is critical to understand that bias and unfair sentencing laws targeted at non-violent criminals does not add to the reduction in crimes, but rather adds to it, and furthers the bottom line of private prisons and the justice system cottage industry.

 

The main goal of community policing is the re-directing of “non-violent” criminal behavior, and familiarizing every body with every other body; this is a powerful means of projecting a truth that all lives matter.