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Ellington Ellis

Thought Leader

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February 2017

RUSSIA AIN’T YOUR FRIEND – Prophetic word to the Church

The Christian Church has been played like a fiddle.
Trump has the maturity of a child. “You think America is so innocent”, says the child president. I understand the benefit of being introspective, that is maturity. But it is a big difference between being introspective and childish. “When I was a child I thought as a child.” In this case, the child has become the President of the United States due to the “Christian Right” seeking a conservative supreme court justice appointee and a Zionist President.

I am here to prophecy that it is all going to backfire and the selection of Trump as the great Christian hope will be a cataclysmic church failure.

 

~Ellington Haywood Ellis~

February 15, 2017

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THE FOLLY OF FIGHTING PROGRESSIVES

 

This post centers on the folly of disrupting the will of the people. You may get by with it in any given election, but it is not sustainable. You can alter destiny, but you can never stop it. This is the fight that I have with Conservatism. Everything must change. Inherent in conservative ideology is conserve. Nothing is conserved, everything is changing. People are not human beings, we are human becomings; we are constantly changing, physically and mentally every millisecond. Conservatives, are fighting against destiny.

We can slow change down, I surmise, but we can never stop it. To believe we can stop progressives or progression is folly in itself. Again, things naturally move from order to chaos (Entropy) Conservatism is a struggle against entropy – degradation – Decomposition – degeneration – decline. Example: when the republicans held up Obama’s supreme court nominee for over a year, it was an attempt to alter progression – change – degeneration – progress. They did nothing more than alter, slowed down change. You cannot stop progressiveness, you can only slow it down. Altering progress always puts one on the wrong side of history. Republicans will live in a constant state of stress and turmoil until they understand this principle.

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Madame C. J. Walker the first female millionaire in America

 

The year is 1905, ten years before the founding of the Maybelline cosmetic company, Madame C.J. Walker founded her cosmetic company, and within 10 years became America’s first female millionaire.

“This modern day Oprah Winfrey made her fortune innovating beauty and hair products for women through Madame C.J. Walker Manufacturing Company, the successful business she founded. she became one of the wealthiest African American women in the country, “the world’s most successful female entrepreneur of her time,” and one of the most successful African-American business owners ever.”

It is interesting to note that Madame C. J. Walker was an associate of the Pentecostal Bishop, Garfield Thomas Haywood. She was known to have supported Haywood’s ministry and attended his funeral upon his death. In fact, the general legal counsel of the C. J. Walker conglomerate, Attorney Robert Lee Brokenburr, another close friend of Haywood, offered his tribute upon Haywood’s death, as reported and in the Indianapolis Recorder Newspaper, “Haywood will go down in history as one of the greatest religious leaders of our generation. He was unselfish and interested in every movement for the uplifting of mankind irrespective of race or color. His activities prove conclusively that a Negro can be more than a Negro leader, for many of his followings were large numbers of the best type of white folks in the country. People of all races came to be taught by him from all parts of the country.

In the founding and developing of his church he did with many of the best minds thought would be impossible; [he brought whites and blacks together.] He had the courage of his conviction, and will carry on in the face of any kind of a position without thought or fear of personal consequences. His presence will long be missed and his services will benefit mankind throughout the years.”

Image: Attorney R. L. Brokenburr. Prominent for years in civil rights litigation in Indianapolis, Indiana.

This relationship between Haywood and C. J. Walker is yet another marker of Pentecostal Oneness influence on America’s growth and race inclusiveness.

It is often said behind every great man is a great woman. Madame C J Walker reveals a greater truth.

 

Pure Creation – Infinite Beauty

Image by: Tommy O’Con

 

What man creates is not creation at all, it is nothing more than the repositioning of elements that exist. ~Ellington Haywood Ellis~

 

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Black History Month – Honoring the Power of Pentecostalism

 

 

James Baldwin, one of the most celebrated black novelist essayist, poet, and social critic was, “one of these”. He was baptized, spoke in other tongues and was indwelled with the Holy Spirit (Acts 2:38). He attended the Mt Calvary Pentecostal church as well as the Fireside Pentecostal church in NYC, where he became a prolific Pentecostal evangelist. Baldwin eventually left religion, but most literary experts say that the strength of Baldwin’s writings and speeches was his cadence of a Pentecostal preacher. Who can argue that the power of Pentecostalism is unmistakably life-changing.

From “Notes of a Native Son” by James Baldwin (Beacon Press, 2012)

Baldwin (right of center) with Hollywood actors Charlton Heston and Marlon Brando at the 1963 Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C. Sidney Poitier (rear) and Harry Belafonte (right of Brando) can also be seen in the crowd.

“Aunt Jemima and Uncle Tom are dead, their places taken by a group of amazingly well-adjusted young men and women, almost as dark, but ferociously literate, well-dressed and scrubbed, who are never laughed at, who are not likely ever to set foot in a cotton or tobacco field or in any but the most modern of kitchens. There are others who remain, in our odd idiom, “underprivileged”; some are bitter and these come to grief; some are unhappy, but, continually presented with the evidence of a better day soon to come, are speedily becoming less so. Most of them care nothing whatever about race. They want only their proper place in the sun and the right to be left alone, like any other citizen of the republic. We may all breathe more easily. Before, however, our joy at the demise of Aunt Jemima and Uncle Tom approaches the indecent, we had better ask whence they sprang, how they lived? Into what limbo have they vanished?

However inaccurate our portraits of them were, these portraits do suggest, not only the conditions, but the quality of their lives and the impact of this spectacle on our consciences. There was no one more forbearing than Aunt Jemima, no one stronger or more pious or more loyal or more wise; there was, at the same time, no one weaker or more faithless or more vicious and certainly no one more immoral. Uncle Tom, trustworthy and sexless, needed only to drop the title “Uncle” to become violent, crafty, and sullen, a menace to any white woman who passed by. They prepared our feast tables and our burial clothes; and, if we could boast that we understood them, it was far more to the point and far more true that they understood us. They were, moreover, the only people in the world who did; and not only did they know us better than we knew ourselves, but they knew us better than we knew them. This was the piquant flavoring to the national joke, it lay behind our uneasiness as it lay behind our benevolence: Aunt Jemima and Uncle Tom, our creations, at the last evaded us; they had a life—their own, perhaps a better life than ours—and they would never tell us what it was. At the point where we were driven most privately and painfully to conjecture what depths of contempt, what heights of indifference, what prodigies of resilience, what untamable superiority allowed them so vividly to endure, neither perishing nor rising up in a body to wipe us from the earth, the image perpetually shattered and the word failed. The black man in our midst carried murder in his heart, he wanted vengeance. We carried murder too, we wanted peace.

Image: Time

In our image of the Negro breathes the past we deny, not dead but living yet and powerful, the beast in our jungle of statistics. It is this which defeats us, which continues to defeat us, which lends to interracial cocktail parties their rattling, genteel, nervously smiling air: in any drawing room at such a gathering the beast may spring, filling the air with flying things and an unenlightened wailing. Wherever the problem touches there is confusion, there is danger. Wherever the Negro face appears a tension is created, the tension of a silence filled with things unutterable. It is a sentimental error, therefore, to believe that the past is dead; it means nothing to say that it is all forgotten, that the Negro himself has forgotten it. It is not a question of memory. Oedipus did not remember the thongs that bound his feet; nevertheless the marks they left testified to that doom toward which his feet were leading him. The man does not remember the hand that struck him, the darkness that frightened him, as a child; nevertheless, the hand and the darkness remain with him, indivisible from himself forever, part of the passion that drives him wherever he thinks to take flight.”

Image: Public Domain

In the words of Grammy award winner, Donnie McClurkin’s song, “Speak to my heart Holy Spirit, give me the words that will bring new life, words on the wings of a morning, my dark nights will fade away, speak to my heart.

 

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Black History Month – Honoring Oneness – We are all connected

 

Today in Black History Month, we Honor Anna Julia Haywood Cooper

Bishop Garfield Thomas Haywood’s Father, Bennett Haywood was born on the slave plantation of Dr Edmund Burke, in Raleigh, North Carolina. Anna Julia Haywood Cooper’s mother slaved on the plantation of Edmund’s brother, George Washington Haywood. Anna Julia Haywood is the daughter of George Washington Haywood and Hannah Stanley Haywood; we are all interconnected.

Anna Julia Haywood Cooper was a writer, teacher, and activist who championed education for African-Americans and women.

“Cooper published her first book, A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South, in 1892. In addition to calling for equal education for women, A Voice from the South advanced Cooper’s assertion that educated African-American women were necessary for uplifting the entire black race. The book of essays gained national attention, and Cooper began lecturing across the country on topics such as education, civil rights, and the status of black women. In 1902, Cooper began a controversial stint as principal of M Street High School (formerly Washington Colored High). The white Washington, D.C. school board disagreed with her educational approach for black students, which focused on college preparation, and she resigned in 1906.

In addition to working to advance African-American educational opportunities, Cooper also established and co-founded several organizations to promote black civil rights causes. She helped found the Colored Women’s League in 1892, and she joined the executive committee of the first Pan-African Conference in 1900. Since the Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA) and the Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) did not accept African-American members, she created “colored” branches to provide support for young black migrants moving from the South into Washington, D.C.

Cooper resumed graduate study in 1911 at Columbia University in New York City, New York. After the death of her brother in 1915, however, she postponed pursuing her doctorate in order to raise his five grandchildren. She returned to school in 1924 when she enrolled at the University of Paris in France. In 1925, at the age of 67, Cooper became the fourth African-American woman to obtain a Doctorate of Philosophy.

In 1930, Cooper retired from teaching to assume the presidency of Frelinghuysen University, a school for black adults. She served as the school’s registrar after it was reorganized into the Frelinghuysen Group of Schools for Colored People. Cooper remained in that position until the school closed in the 1950s.

Anna Julia Cooper died in 1964 in Washington, D.C. at the age of 105.”

Sources:

Anna Julia Cooper, A Voice from the South (New York: Oxford University Press, 1988); Paula J. Giddings, When and Where I Enter: The Impact of Black Women on Race and Sex in America (New York: Harper Collins, 2001); Kimberly Springer, “Anna Julia Haywood Cooper,” in African-American Lives, ed. Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham (New York: Oxford University Press, 2004).

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Black History Month Honors White History Heroics

John Brown (1800-1859) – “I consecrate my life to the destruction of slavery.” A fervent abolitionist who believed in armed insurrection against the institution of slavery. In 1859, he led an armed uprising in Harpers Ferry, Virginia aiming to free slaves and end the practice. He was executed for his attempted uprising.

After the Civil War, Frederick Douglass wrote, “His zeal in the cause of my race was far greater than mine—it was as the burning sun to my taper light—mine was bounded by time, his stretched away to the boundless shores of eternity. I could live for the slave, but he could die for him.

The Last Moments of John Brown (1882–84) by Thomas Hovenden

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