It was 1978, a helicopter of geologists surveying the wilderness discovered a family of six.

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Lost deep in the Russian Siberian wilderness, a family was found practicing the Christian religion utilizing a bible untainted from any modern version of the Christian bible. The discovery of this family not only proves the strength of the human spirit, but it underlines the strength of faith.

 

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What I find interesting is the similarity in the practices of this family in the wilderness and the early Oneness Pentecostal Movement, in America.

 

“Beside a stream there was a dwelling. Blackened by time and rain, the hut was piled up on all sides with taiga rubbish—bark, poles, planks. If it hadn’t been for a window the size of my backpack pocket, it would have been hard to believe that people lived there. But they did, no doubt about it…. Our arrival had been noticed, as we could see. The low door creaked, and the figure of a very old man emerged into the light of day, straight out of a fairy tale. Barefoot. Wearing a patched and repatched shirt made of sacking. He wore trousers of the same material, also in patches, and had an uncombed beard. His hair was disheveled”

 

“The old man’s name was Karp Lykov, and he was an Old Believer–a member of a fundamentalist Russian Orthodox sect, worshiping in a style unchanged since the 17th century.

 

These “Old Believer” Orthodox Christians believe the incarnate Word of God is one person in two natures, both fully divine and fully human, perfectly God (τέλειος Θεός) and perfectly man (τέλειος άνθρωπος). Throughout the ages this has been a point of contention between schismatic Christian theological factions (heterodox) and the mainstream body of Christian believers (orthodox). Christ had a divine will, or set of desires and spiritual incentives, and a human will with fleshly drives. He had a human body, human mind, and human spirit able to be tempted with sin and to suffer the same way as we would. In this way God is said to have suffered and died in the flesh of Jesus, although the divine nature is itself impassible and immortal. Orthodox Christians believe that Jesus of Nazareth is the promised Messiah of the Jews, the God of Israel come to be with His people, the Redeemer of the human race who saves the world from sin and its effects, the comprehensible self-revelation of the incomprehensible God, and the pre-eternal Son begotten of the Father before all ages: “the only-begotten Son of God, begotten of the Father before all worlds (æons), Light of Light, very God of very God, begotten, not made, being of one substance with the Father.”[2] He is said to have been begotten timelessly as God without a mother and begotten in history as man without a father.

 

Orthodox Christians believe in the betrayal, trial, execution, burial and resurrection of Jesus Christ, that he truly rose from the dead on the third day following his crucifixion. The feast of the resurrection of Christ, which is called “Easter” in Germanic languages, is known as Pascha in the Orthodox Church. This is a the Aramaic variant (the language spoken at the time of Jesus) of the Hebrew Pesach, meaning “Passover”. The resurrection of Christ is the Christian Passover. Pascha is called “the Feast of Feasts” and is considered the greatest feast of all the Church’s liturgical feasts, including the feasts of the Nativity (Christmas) and the Annunciation.

 

AGAFYA, THE LAST SURVIVING MEMBER OF THE RESCUED FAMILY, IS AN OLD BELIEVER – A RELIGIOUS MOVEMENT THAT SPLINTERED FROM THE RUSSIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH IN THE 17TH CENTURY, ENDURED PERSECUTION BOTH BEFORE AND AFTER THE BOLSHEVIK REVOLUTION.
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