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The man at the CENTER of it all…Beyond Comprehension

“The Life of Haywood” is a fascinating biography about one of the least-known chapters in the life of Bishop Garfield Thomas Haywood. It is eye-opening, inspiring and informative.

Revealed and written through a great grandson, it is an insider’s perspective on the life and times of the man. This biography is an unparalleled story about Haywood. It engages the intersection of religion and race in America at the turn of the 20th century.

Long before Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the civil rights movement, the oneness posse of Haywood, Urshan, Rowe, Doak, Lewis and Varnell, Hancock among others are paving the way of racial togetherness. Today, being led by the United Pentecostal Church (UPCI), the Pentecostal Assemblies of the World (PAW) and Pentecostal Churches of the Apostolic Faith (PCAF), the Oneness Pentecostal movement stands alone in its unprecedented commitment to racial harmony. This book takes you on fascinating real life journey of the man at the center of it all.

Living without the Camp

Chapter 1 Excerpt

…Penny Haywood is awaken from a deep sleep to hear the footsteps of slave catchers. She could see the early morning sunlight peaking its way through the rotting planks of the old plantation barn. A warm loving, but shaking palm, is covering her mouth. ‘Duh slave catchus be here,” whispers her mother. They both laid quietly on the cold floor. An eternal hour lingers before the slave catchers are gone.

Penny Haywood tells this story of her early slave life to her young son Garfield Haywood. This story has a profound impact upon Garfield’s life. Born into slavery Bennett and Penny Haywood, the parents of G.T. Haywood, had an unwanted front row seat to one of the most tumultuous times in human history. However, a far more gripping revelation is that the Haywood’s were not only escapees along the underground railroad, but they became active railroad conductors leading others to freedom; foretelling a greater work to come.

Shackled not only with chains, but confined with humiliation, and depression. “Living without the camp” became commonplace for the Haywood’s but it never became a place of complacency…

                                                                    Huffington Post

 

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